31 Aug

What’s behind Australia’s syphilis outbreak and the rise of STIs?

In what Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, described as a ‘surge response’, on 8 August the federal government injected an emergency $8.8 million into tackling an outbreak of syphilis in N
31 Aug

The case for targeted preventive healthcare

Australians travelling overseas and needing medical treatment will be familiar with the leading-edge quality of our health system – from our hospitals, pharmaceutical benefits system and pathology l
31 Aug

Is health in the western world at the bottom of a nasty J-curve?

For most of human history one of the major threats to a long life was scarcity: in particular scarcity of food and medicine. Hunger and disease made life – to paraphrase the 17th century philosopher
26 Jul

FOFO a no-no; five good reasons to do the bowel screening test

Those in contact with young people may be familiar with the acronym FOMO. For those not in the know, FOMO stands for Fear of Missing Out. But very few people will be familiar with the acronym FOFO –
26 Jul

Screen time: what is a screening test and why do we have them?

Most of us will be familiar with a few of Australia’s screening programs, like the bowel cancer screening program or mammograms for breast cancer screening, but what does screening actually mean, an
29 Jun

Politicians roll up their sleeves in Canberra as Diabetes Australia calls for wider blood testing to arrest Australian diabetes epidemic

Usually when politicians roll up their sleeves in Canberra it involves some form of parliamentary fisticuffs, but recently Parliament House saw pollies rolling up their sleeves to have their blood tes
29 Jun

Pathology and kidney disease: from diagnosis to exciting research on transplants

Kidney conditions can manifest themselves with a variety of symptoms, such as general tiredness or the swelling of limbs from the retention of excess fluid. However, 90% of kidney function can be lost
25 May

In Focus: Haemochromatosis or ‘Iron Overload’ (sadly nothing to do with Iron Man)

In Australia, it’s estimated that roughly one in 200 Australians of Caucasian heritage suffer from haemochromatosis, making it the country’s most common genetic disorder. Yet, it’s still an unfa
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